Arrowhead Union High School Hosts Special Olympic Volleyball Tournament to Benefit Breast Cancer

Arrowhead Union High School Hosts Special Olympic Volleyball Tournament to Benefit Breast Cancer

Maria Francis, Reporter

On Saturday, October 8th, 2016, Arrowhead will host a Special Olympic volleyball tournament at the AHS South Campus Upper Gym. Set-up starts at 6:40 a.m. Lunch is available from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The invite is from 7:45 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Games begin at 8:00 a.m. and end at 4:00 p.m.

“The athletes of Café Arrowhead will hosting a Pink Hair extensions event on Saturday, October 8, 2016, to benefit Breast Cancer Awareness. This is a cause that is very dear to us,” said John Hough, Arrowhead Staff member. Hough is the Head Coach Special Olympics of volleyball, gymnastics, and track.

“This is the second year that AHS Special Olympic volleyballs teams are hosting the Pink Possible event; proceeds will benefit Aurora Breast Health Funds, supporting education, prevention and survivorship,” said Meredith A Londo, Aurora Health Care Foundation Coordinator for Aurora Medical Center Summit.

The pink hair extensions fundraiser will be occurring during the volleyball tournament.

Proceeds from the fundraiser will benefit Aurora Breast Health Funds, which support education, prevention and survivorship. For more information, visit give.aurora.org/pinkpossible.

“Last year, roughly one-third of the women in Wisconsin newly diagnosed with breast cancer chose Aurora Cancer Care for their care. For more than nine years, this cause-related fundraising campaign has helped raise breast cancer awareness in our communities while engaging local businesses to raise funds for Aurora Cancer Care breast cancer patients and their families,” Aurora’s website states.

“Craig Berns Salon Spa will have two stylists at Arrowhead on Saturday, October 8th, to do Pink Hair Extensions. The $15 will go directly to the Pink Possible Campaign through Aurora. The two stylists will be at the high school between approx 11:30am and 1pm,” said Mary Beth Berns, Craig Berns Salon and Spa staff member.

Volunteer stylists will be at the event supporting the cause. Cost is $15.00 per extension.

“The proceeds will benefit Aurora Breast Health Funds supporting education, prevention and survivorship and distributed at the local level,” said Hough.

“Nationally, one out of eight women will hear the words ‘you have breast cancer’ at some point in their lifetime. Last year, roughly one-third of the women in Wisconsin newly diagnosed with breast cancer chose Aurora Cancer Care for their care. For more than nine years, this cause-related fundraising campaign has helped raise breast cancer awareness in our communities while engaging local businesses to raise funds for Aurora Cancer Care breast cancer patients and their families,” said Londo.

“In 2016, it is estimated that among U.S. women there will be 246,660 new cases of invasive breast cancer. This includes new cases of primary breast cancer among survivors, but not recurrence of original breast cancer among survivors. 61,000 new cases of in situ breast cancer. This includes ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). Of those, about 83 percent will be DCIS. DCIS is a non-invasive breast cancer and LCIS is a condition that increases the risk of invasive breast cancer.

“Breast cancer in men is rare, but it does happen. In 2016, it is estimated that among men in the U.S. there will be: 2,600 new cases…This includes new cases of primary breast cancer among survivors, but not recurrence of original breast cancer among survivors. 440 breast cancer deaths Rates of breast cancer incidence (new cases) and mortality (death) are much lower among men than among women.

“The two most common risk factors for breast cancer are: being female and getting older. The risk of getting breast cancer increases as you age. Most breast cancers and breast cancer deaths occur in women aged 50 and older. Although rare, younger women can also get breast cancer. Fewer than five percent of breast cancers occur in women under age 40. However, breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death…among women ages 20-59,” said Londo.